ENQUIRY
Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

intrinsic

“Vitality management is provided for organizations that have a vision”. A quote from Pauline van Dorssen coach of “Vital people in a vital organization”. This is a new successful training (NIP). Positive psychology and the use of vitality are central. The interest of both Occupational and Organizational Psychologists and Occupational Health Psychologists is high: all groups are full. In addition, the same question arises from organizations. They need advice and coaching in the field of vitality.

To know more, here is the original article in dutch language: Artikel_De Psycholoog_lisa van der Heijden

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist.

If you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents, contact me at Promises Healthcare on +65 6397 7309 or email lisa@promises.com.sg.

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

The Relationship Between Media Multitasking and Executive Function in Early Adolescents

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The increasing prevalence of media multitasking among adolescents is concerning because it may be negatively related to goal-directed behavior. This study investigated the relationship between media multitasking and executive function in 523 early adolescents (aged 11-15; 48% girls).

The three central components of executive functions (i.e., working memory, shifting, and inhibition) were measured using self-reports and standardized performance-based tasks (Digit Span, Eriksen Flankers task, Dots–Triangles task). Findings show that adolescents who media multitask more frequently reported having more problems in the three domains of executive function in their everyday lives.

Media multitasking was not related to the performance on the Digit Span and Dots–Triangles task. Adolescents who media multitasked more frequently tended to be better in ignoring irrelevant distractions in the Eriksen Flankers task. Overall, results suggest that media multitasking is negatively related to executive function in everyday life.

To read the full article: http://jea.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/17/0272431614523133.abstract

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist, Susanne E. Baumgartner and Wouter D. Weeda.

If you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents, contact me at Promises Healthcare on +65 6397 7309 or email lisa@promises.com.sg.

Self-Harm Series – Part 3 –

Self-Harm Series – Part 3 –

Self -Harm

What can I do to help my teen?
In addition to regular professional mental health support, here are some things you can do to help your teen:
– Show that you care
– Be non-judgmental
– Accept your teen’s feelings
– Suggest distractions
– Learn basic first aid
– Encourage them to communicate their feelings
– Ensure an authoritative balance in your parenting style

Avoid:
– Guilt trips
– Punishing your teen for self-harm

What can the school do to support my teen?
Ask to see your school’s policy on self-harm management. If your school does not have a policy, get in touch with your treating psychologist who can provide the school with resources and psycho-education. Make sure the school counselor sees your teen regularly, and that they are aware of any safety and risk issues.

If you suspect that your teen is self-harming, seek professional help as soon as possible. Contact Leeran at Promises Healthcare on 6397-7309, or email leeran@promises.com.sg for a confidential enquiry.

If your teen is in any danger, contact your local ambulance service on 995. You can contact the Institute for Mental Health 24-hour hotline on 6389-2222.

This is part 3, of a series of 3 posts        Click here for Part 1     Click here for Part 2

Written by: Leeran Gold – Psychologist, Forensic Services, Promises Healthcare

Self-Harm Series – Part 2 –

Self-Harm Series – Part 2 –

Self-Harm

How do I know if my teen is self-harming?
Self-harming is usually a very private and secretive behavior. Teens may self-harm on areas of their bodies that are difficult to see. In some cases, teens may self-harm in more obvious areas including their wrists, ankles, arms and legs.
If you notice dressing or bandages, or cuts, bruises, burns and/or marks in these areas, your teen may be self-harming.
Other signs can include withdrawing from friends and family, excessive moodiness, increased irritability and anger outbursts, and changes in appetite and body weight.

Why is my teen self-harming?
Teens may self-harm in order to cope with stress. Self-harm can temporarily numb or relieve their distress, and can be a way of communicating their distress to others. Teens who self-harm often lack healthy coping strategies and feel helpless in managing their distress.

If your teen is self-harming, or you suspect that they are, seek professional help as soon as possible. Please contact Leeran at Promises Healthcare on +65 6397 7309 or email leeran@promises.com.sg for a confidential enquiry.

If your teen is in any danger, you can contact your local ambulance service on 995. You can contact the Institute for Mental Health 24-hour hotline on 6389-2222.

This is part 2, of a series of 3 posts         Click here for Part 1 

Written by: Leeran Gold – Psychologist, Forensic Services, Promises Healthcare

Self-Harm Series – Part 1 –

Self-Harm Series – Part 1 –

self-harm

What is self-harm?
Self-harm is the deliberate self-inflicted destruction of body tissue. It can occur with or without suicidal intentions. A commonly used term is ‘non-suicidal self-injury’ (NSSI), which refers to self-injury that is carried out without suicidal intent.

If my teen self-harms, does that mean they are suicidal?
It does not necessarily mean that your teen is suicidal if they self-harm. However every teen that self-harms should undergo a thorough suicide risk assessment. If your teen is self-harming, it is a sign that they are in distress.

What are self-harming behaviors?
Some self-harming behaviors include; cutting, burning, scratching, pinching, biting and hitting. Teens may also take minor overdoses of easily accessibly medications.

If your teen is self-harming, or you suspect that they are, seek professional help as soon as possible. Please contact Leeran at Promises Healthcare on +65 6397 7309 or email leeran@promises.com.sg for a confidential enquiry.

If your teen is in any danger, you can contact your local ambulance service on 995. You can contact the Institute for Mental Health 24-hour hotline on 6389-2222.

This is part 1, of a series of 3 posts

Click here for Part 2 

Written by: Leeran Gold – Psychologist, Forensic Services, Promises Healthcare