ENQUIRY
NeuroStar TMS Therapy®

NeuroStar TMS Therapy®

TMS1

How Does NeuroStar TMS Therapy® Work?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) uses a targeted pulsed magnetic field, similar to what is used in an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) machine. While the patient is awake and alert, NeuroStar TMS Therapy stimulates areas of the brain that are underactive in depression.2

NeuroStar TMS Therapy is an in-office treatment that takes 37 minutes, is performed while the patient sits in a chair, and is administered five days a week, for up to four to six weeks.

Simple steps for NeuroStar TMS Therapy:

  • Step One: The patient reclines comfortably in the treatment chair, awake and alert
  • Step Two: A small curved device containing the magnetic coil rests lightly on the patient’s head
  • Step Three: The device delivers focused magnetic stimulation directly to the target areas of the brain
  • Step Four: The patient can immediately resume normal activities

During treatment, the patient hears a clicking sound and feels a tapping sensation on the head. The most common side effect is generally mild-to-moderate pain or discomfort at or near the treatment area during the session. When this occurs it is temporary, and typically occurs only during the first week of treatment.

There are no effects on alertness or understanding; patients being treated with NeuroStar TMS Therapy can drive themselves to and from their treatment sessions. Above information is taken from: https://neurostar.com/neurostar-tms-depression-treatment/

For more information on the rTMS treatment, please go to http://www.tms-singapore.com/ or call us at +65 63977309.

 

Myth Busting Mental Health – Self-Harm

violence-self-harm

Although society has made some headway in reducing the stigma and misinformation about general mental health issues, the public’s understanding of self-harm remains decades behind. Let’s debunk some common myths about adolescent self-harm.

Myth: ‘Self-harm means cutting right? Only emos and goths do that.’

Self-harm refers to a range of behaviours that are purposely inflicted to cause damage to the body. It can include cutting, but also refers to scratching, picking at wounds, burning, pinching, hitting, head banging, and minor overdosing. Self-harm can also be in the form of excessive risk-taking that is above and beyond typical adolescent risk-taking.

It is a misconception that only ’emos’ and ‘goths’ self-harm. Although self-harm can be part of adolescent subculture experimentation, it is more often a sign that a teenager is experiencing unmanageable distress. Self-harm becomes a way of coping with distress that provides temporary relief from emotional pain.

Myth: ‘Self-harm is all about attention-seeking. If a person was really depressed enough to cut themselves then they would probably just commit suicide.’

Self-harm is not about attention-seeking. It is often a secretive and private behaviour. For a teenager, self-harm is a way of coping with unmanageable distress, and can be a medium to communicate that distress to others. Self-harm should never be dismissed as attention-seeking.

A person who cuts themselves is not necessarily suicidal. Cutting behaviour can be suicidal, non-suicidal, or a mix of both. It is important to remember that suicide risk is not static. A teenager who displays non-suicidal self-harm can become suicidal at another point in time.

Any teen who self-harms should undergo a thorough and comprehensive suicide risk assessment by a registered mental health professional. Their suicide risk should be closely monitored and assessed at regular intervals.

Myth: ‘I can punish my teen so that they stop self-harming. That will solve the problem.’

Punishing a teen for self-harming does not solve the problem. Cutting is a symptom of a deeper issue – unmanageable distress. Stopping the cutting via punishment may actually worsen their distress, especially if the teen lacks healthy and effective coping strategies.

Here are some suggestions for what you can do instead of punishing your teen:

  • Be an active listener
  • Validating their feelings
  • Be emotionally and physically present for them
  • Engage in joint problem solving

Always seek advice from a registered mental health professional if you suspect that your teen may be self-harming.

Written by Leeran Gold, Psychologist in our Forensic Service.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.

For after-hours crisis support contact your local mental health service or emergency services.

In Singapore: IMH 24-hour helpline +65 6389 2222, Ambulance 995.

Myth Busting Mental Health – Youth Suicide

Myth Busting Mental Health – Youth Suicide

youth-suicideLet’s take a look at some common mental health myths about youth suicide and set the record straight.

Attempted suicides are just a cry for attention.

A suicide attempt should never be dismissed as ‘just a cry for attention’. A young person is highlighting that their level of internal distress is unmanageable and unbearable. They need help, not judgement. A young person can feel even more isolated and misunderstood if those around them fail to take their actions seriously. Never ignore or minimise suicidal behaviours and seek professional help as soon as possible.

Teens who cut their wrists must be suicidal.

Cutting is a form of self-injury that can either be suicidal or non-suicidal. In both cases, the cutting is a sign that a young person is not managing their internal distress in a healthy way. Any young person who self-injures should undergo a full suicide risk assessment by a registered mental health professional.

If I ask a young person whether they are feeling suicidal, it might put the idea in their head.

This is a particularly dangerous myth as it discourages discussion of the issue at hand. Talking about suicidal feelings will not encourage a young person to commit suicide. When having the conversation try to stay calm and non-confrontational. Remain open and genuine, and remember the overall message – it is ok to talk about feelings, and there is help available. Show that you care and avoid judging the young person. If you are uncomfortable or unsure about having the conversation, get in touch with a mental health professional for some tips and guidance.

Written by Leeran Gold, Psychologist in our Forensic Service.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life, away from addiction and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.

For after-hours crisis support contact your local mental health service or emergency services.

In Singapore: IMH 24-hour helpline +65 6389 2222, Ambulance 995.

How did they get that way?

How did they get that way?

Promises healthcare Addiction Recovery

Many of us want to know how a person becomes an addict. Such compulsion is often described as a: “bio-psycho-social disease”. Some people inherit genetic vulnerabilities. They are predisposed to anxiety, depression, anger, stress and impulsivity.

Some may have suffered dreadful traumas. Neglected childhoods.  Were thrill seekers. They got in with the wrong crowd in school. Did badly in class. Have low frustration and distress tolerance. Some have jobs or friends that make drink and drugs the norm. Some struggle with boredom and routine. Delayed gratification is tough for them. Some are overwhelmed by intense feelings. Some have a combination of these things. And everyone is different.

But how does knowing the root cause help with recovery? It may not. The recovery solution is in the present and in the future – not in the past. What can you do, here and now, to make a difference?

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life, away from addiction and find renewed hope. Please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.

 Written by: Andrew da Roza – Psychotherapist, Promise Healthcare Pte. Ltd.

3000 Pulses to Happiness?

3000 Pulses to Happiness?

TMS picture of Leeran on TMS

 

 

 

 

 

 

3000 Pulses to Happiness?… yes it is possible through TMS treatment!

Each of us has a different genetic make-up, which is why anti-depressants might be ineffective. Depression is a chronic mental illness that cannot be overcome by simple positive thinking. Many who suffer cannot lead a normal life and are often in isolation.

Promises Healthcare is the pioneer in providing rTMS treatment. rTMS stands for Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or repetitive magnetic brain stimulation (also called TMS). It is a non-drug alternative to anti-depressants and ECT without any of the side effects. The treatment requires 20-30 sessions lasting 40 minutes each. During each session 3000 magnetic pulses are delivered to the specific area of the brain that regulates moods.

For more information on the rTMS treatment, please go to http://www.tms-singapore.com/ or call us at +65 63977309.