ENQUIRY
Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

Intrinsic motivation as a source of vitality?

intrinsic

“Vitality management is provided for organizations that have a vision”. A quote from Pauline van Dorssen coach of “Vital people in a vital organization”. This is a new successful training (NIP). Positive psychology and the use of vitality are central. The interest of both Occupational and Organizational Psychologists and Occupational Health Psychologists is high: all groups are full. In addition, the same question arises from organizations. They need advice and coaching in the field of vitality.

To know more, here is the original article in dutch language: Artikel_De Psycholoog_lisa van der Heijden

Written by Lisa van der Heijden, Clinical Psychologist.

If you are interested to know and learn more therapy for children/adolescents, contact me at Promises Healthcare on +65 6397 7309 or email lisa@promises.com.sg.

Care Community Fun Fair : 5 August 2017

Care Community Fun Fair : 5 August 2017

2017-08-03-PHOTO-00000182

HMI Institute of Health Sciences in support of the FestivalForGood (organised by raiSE) invites you to join us for hands-on experiences on caregiving through training simulations and fun activities. Some takeaway knowledge include:

  • Knowing how to create a safe home environment for your aged parents/grandparents
  • Safe feeding skills for Caregivers
  • Understanding Caregivers’ stress & preventing/relieving these stresses
  • Understanding how your aged parents/grandparents feel
  • Recognising illnesses & emergencies
  • Simple skills on CPR

-and many more!

Our Career Coaches will also be around to assist you with information on our training programmes and career services.

Event Details

  • Date & Day: 05 August 2017 (Saturday)
  • 3 Sessions: 9:00am · 11:00am · 1:00pm
  • Venue:
    HMI Institute of Health Sciences @
    Devan Nair Institute for Employment and Employability, 
    80 Jurong East Street 21, #06-03, Singapore 609607

To know more information about this event, you can click here: link:http://hmi-ihs.com/index.php/care-community-fun-fair-05-aug-2017

A Play in Psychodrama

A Play in Psychodrama

IMG_4368

As I mentioned in my first article, the phrase,”reverse roles” was very much what I heard at my first psychodrama workshop. As this was uttered by the group leader, two people on the stage switched places and began playing the opposite role. 

 “This is it! “, I thought as I began to think of how I could use it in my work. Get people to reverse roles and voila! Well I was sorely mistaken those many years ago. As I began to explore this fascinating form of group work I discovered several techniques that are used in Psychodrama. Here are two key techniques used and an example of how I used them. 

Role reversal

Here the Protagonist says a few words in the role of a particular ‘character’ or entity in their drama. The Auxiliary then says these lines to the Protagonist who is in the complimentary role. 

Concretization

In this technique, objects and people are used to represent the scenario the Protagonist wishes to explore.

A Drama using Role reversal and Concretization

Ken is aged 19, and has a serious problem with drugs and alcohol which he has managed to stop after going to the alcohol treatment centre. He had just come out of Rehab in the United Kingdom and was brought to my practice by his concerned father. His father has tried very hard to help him over the years and has now brought Ken to us at Promises. Ken is worried about going out for dinner with his Father and a family Friend, whom we shall call Andy, because he might be tempted to drink again.

I encourage him to enact a scene at dinner with his father and Andy, playing out what he expects to happen. He sets out the chairs and chooses two people in the group to be his Father and Andy. As he greets the two older men rather lethargically, his shoulders slouch and he speaks in a flat voice.

Reversing roles, Ken now plays the part of Andy. He perks up now, smiling and full of energy. ‘Andy’ says, “The last time I saw you Ken, you were a small boy. My how you’ve grown!” Playing the role of his tempter, he urges Ken to “have a drink now as a real man” holding a glass towards him.

Back to being himself after another role reversal Ken’s face reddens and he clenches his fists in agitation.  He speaks to me as the Director, saying that he is afraid he might have a relapse. I immediately ask him to take on the role of his father.

As his father, he sits with his arms crossed and says through clenched teeth, “It’s Ok, you don’t have to drink. I don’t want to cause a relapse.” As himself, Ken is at a loss for words. I ask the other audience members to do some modeling and try different responses in the role of Ken as he watches.

Ken cheers up as he sees the other group members rising to the occasion. Everyone is animated as they get a chance to act the part and try to tell Andy off. There is much laughter and hilarity as people do and say whatever they think might work. A sort of role training session is underway.

Ken is noticeably inspired by the group and he chooses one response. He stands tall with a cheeky smile and says to Andy, “I’m not drinking today, and I wonder why you are so determined to force alcohol on me!”  In role reversal as Andy, he changes the subject and backs down, no longer the magnanimous host. The drama ends. Ken is no longer a deflated doomsday worry wart. Instead he is positive about going out for dinner and knows what he can do later that night at dinner. The group has come to his aid and I once again marvel at the magic of Psychodrama.

In future articles, I shall illustrate more psychodrama techniques with dramas I have directed. It continues to be a privilege to be allowed into the lives of group members and I am continually amazed at the transformations that happen.

Written by Sharmini Winslow, Therapist.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.

What is Psychodrama?

What is Psychodrama?

IMG_4386

This is a series of article about the Action Method of Psychodrama by Sharmini Winslow.

“Reverse roles!”, the group leader shouted, and two people switched roles on stage and began enacting the opposite part. I was in the middle of my first Psychodrama workshop and all seemed chaotic and yet pleasantly therapeutic. What was going on? My desire to explore psychodrama had brought me here to a large room with a group leader and several very friendly people. Soon I was learning the ropes and I tried to make sense of things. 7 years later, I am still held captive by the magic of psychodrama.

Often people ask me,”what is Psychodrama?”, and I ask if they have 10 minutes to listen. It is a therapeutic action method that usually is done in groups. So here is a short description that will suffice for now.

Psychodrama, is the brainchild of Dr J.L. Moreno. It comes from two words, Psycho and drama. Psycho (not like in the movie where someone slashes you in the shower with a knife), is derived from the word ‘psyche’ which means the mental or psychological structure of a person. Drama refers to the enactment or action that happens in the session.

There are 5 instruments in Psychodrama

  • The Director

In the group, the therapist or group leader takes on this role and keeps the action flowing and gives structure to what evolves on the stage.

  • The Stage

This can be any space set aside for the enactments to occur. In a group, the stage is the space apart from where group members are seated. Moreno built a stage in New York specifically for psychodrama which had the audience seated at a different level. I had the privilege of directing a drama on the original stage.

  • The Audience

These are the group members who are not involved in the drama but who act as witnesses and can respond to the action on stage as a normal audience would, often yelling encouragement to the protagonist.

  • The Protagonist

This is the person who represents the main concerns of the group. Usually chosen by the group, the Protagonist gets to put into action a concern, a challenge or an event that they would like to have turned out differently. In psychodrama, past, future and present can coexist in the Here and Now.

  • The Auxiliary

The Auxiliary or sometimes called the Auxiliary Ego is the group member chosen to be a certain element or person in the drama, for example the protagonist’s Sister or maybe their addiction.

Each session has a warm up, an enactment phase and time for sharing. In the sharing segment, group members get to share something about their own lives that is connected to the drama.

So in Psychodrama the protagonist’s inner world gets “‘concretized” or made real, and the Director helps the Protagonist explore and work spontaneously to create new ways of being that are more helpful in living with whatever challenge was enacted. New perspectives are discovered; insights and conclusions made that bring healing and newness. The Protagonist and group members experience the wonder of being spontaneous and are positively energized!

*Psychodrama is used in group sessions run by Sharmini as part of her practice at Promises.

Written by Sharmini Winslow, Therapist.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to helping you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.

Strategies to stick to your New Year’s Resolution

Strategies to stick to your New Year’s Resolution

resolution

Have you ever wondered why it’s so tough to stick to your new year’s resolutions? According to Statistics Brain Research Institute, only 9.2% of Americans feel like they have achieved their resolutions in the past year. Here are some strategies from psychologist and behaviour change expert, Dr Paul Marciano, and the American Psychological Association to help you with sticking to your resolutions this year.

  1. Set realistic resolutions

Most of us are guilty of making impractical resolutions that we can’t keep. For example, we aim to exercise more regularly, from barely going to the gym once a week, to aiming for seven days.  Instead of setting unrealistic resolutions, you can try starting with something that’s small, practical and within your abilities. Rather than aiming for seven days of exercise, you could start with three or four. Josh Klapow, an Alabama-based clinical psychologist says, “It is far better to succeed at a smaller, more manageable resolution than to fail at a larger, loftier one.”

  1. Have patience

Bad habits develop over time. Similarly, it also takes time to substitute bad habits for good ones.  When making resolutions, we often overestimate ourselves and try to re-evaluate our lives.  We have to accept that development is rarely consistent and aim to change one behaviour at a time. Hence, having the patience to work through on resolution at a time will help you stick to them.

  1. Talk about your goals

Having support from your social group is vital. Sharing your goals with friends and family increases the chances of success. Rather than trying to achieve your goal alone, you could join a fitness class at a gym, join a support group to quit smoking, or even just have someone to check in on your progress (accountability partner). Having social support and people to share successes and failures will make the process less daunting.

  1. Be resilient

Resilience is vital in achieving your resolutions. When you slip-up and get discouraged, it is important to remember that it’s impossible to achieve perfection. Just because you were busy and didn’t manage to go for your gym classes doesn’t mean that you have failed and should give up your goal to be fit. What is critical is to bounce back from your mistakes and continue to work towards your goal. According to founder of MoneyCrashers, Andrew Schrage, it is useful to set targets throughout the year, so that you can keep yourself in check and your momentum going.

  1. Get support

When you’re feeling overpowered when trying to achieve your resolutions, it is important to remember people who can listen and care for you. Seeking professional help can reinforce your resilience and manage stress stemming from your resolution. For example, a psychologist can suggest ways for you to fine-tune your goals to make them more achievable.

  1. Make your resolutions more precise

Dr. Marciano recommends setting specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound (SMART) goals. Instead of just setting a goal to lose weight, you should be more specific and aim for a particular weight or body-fat percentage goal, or allocate a time every day to go for a run.

  1. Track your development

Reflecting on your starting point and the developments you have made creates feedback loops. This allows you to track improvements during your endeavour and it will be an incentive to continue. It also enables you to reflect and adjust your strategies accordingly when you’re declining or when you’re not improving as much.

  1. Set aside time for your goals

Allocate time for your resolutions and make them a priority by putting them on your schedule. This way, you won’t have the excuse of not being able to find the time to complete something. If you’re trying to get fit, block out certain hours of the day to complete your run or schedule certain fitness classes into your calendar. Treating your fitness classes or runs as though they are scheduled appointments can help you stick to them.

At Promises Healthcare, we are committed to help you through your journey to recovery. Discover a new life and find renewed hope. If you or someone you know needs mental health support, please contact our clinic on: +65 6397 7309 or email: clinic@promises.com.sg for inquiries and consultations.