Caregiver Archives - Promises Healthcare
ENQUIRY
Benefits of Family Therapy in the Caregiving Process

Benefits of Family Therapy in the Caregiving Process

When one has to live with debilitating chronic conditions or even degenerative disorders, it is natural that we place emphasis on seeing that the afflicted recover and receive the appropriate management. As our society rapidly ages, the number of elderly living with medical conditions or dementia is also increasing exponentially. However, the care should extend beyond the patients themselves. More often than not, there are other individuals involved, including family members and friends dedicated to supporting their recovery. Is it time we acknowledge their efforts and ensure they are coping well? 

 

Caregiving can be exceptionally draining – both physically and emotionally – when a family member becomes a patient at home. Needless to say, we are unable to predict such unfortunate circumstances, and caregivers are often thrown into their roles without prior knowledge and preparation. This leaves them with no choice but to adapt and pick up new skills in order to commit to their caregiving responsibilities. However, this can take a toll on the primary caregiver as well as family relationships. 

 

With a large part of their time allocated to caring for another person, caregivers are much more susceptible to fatigue and prolonged stress, with little or no time for self-care. It can be a big problem if the caregiver feels that there’s no support – family and social relationships can be compromised, thereby further reducing any support network that a caregiver can receive. This can lead to burnout and immense feelings of helplessness. 

 

A survey by the Singapore Management University (SMU) with the support of Caregivers Alliance Limited (CAL), Enable Asia and the Singapore Association for Mental Health (SAMH), reveals that 3 in 4 caregivers are tired and exhausted caring for a person with mental health issues. Furthermore, the Family Caregiver Alliance estimates that close to 20 percent of family caregivers suffer from some form of depression. In addition, mental health disorders are even more common among dementia caregivers. A study conducted on mental health issues in those caring for Alzheimer’s patients found that the prevalence of depression was an alarming 34 percent, anxiety was 43.6 percent, and the use of psychotropic drugs was 27.2 percent.

 

Some other common problems that caregivers face include (but are not limited to):

 

Mental health concerns Physical health concerns  Secondary Stressors
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • High rates of negative affect including guilt, sadness, dread, irritation and worry
  • Ambivalence about care
  • Witnessing the suffering of relatives
  • Feeling isolated or abandoned by others
  • Anticipatory grief
  • Fatigue
  • Sleep problems
  • Risk of illness, injury, mortality
  • Adverse changes in health status
  • Dysregulation of stress hormones

 

 

  • Work/employment (e.g., reduction in work hours, family to work spillover, and work to family spillover)
  • Financial strains
  • Relationship stress
  • Loss of time for self-care
  • Reduced quality of life

 

 

 

This is where family therapy comes in. Families might find therapy useful when they are adapting to a major change in the family such as dealing with a chronic illness or death in the family, or conflicts between family members in the caregiving process. Family therapy is a method to engage family caregivers in active and focused problem-solving approaches related to family caregiving to improve the quality of care, reduce burden and improve family functioning. Family therapy for caregivers, in particular, encompasses six core processes – naming the problem, structuring care, role structuring, role reverberations, caregiver self-care and widening the lens. Therapy is conducted in a way that is tailored to each household. Depending on the needs that caregivers and their families must address, the aspects that are challenging them will become the focus of intervention. Not covering all six areas doesn’t mean that the therapist isn’t taking a comprehensive approach – the core processes simply act as a guideline, and do not imply a rigid prescription of intervention work. 

 

Conflicts and resentment often arise for anyone in the role of family caregiver, and these are exacerbated when trying to share tasks with siblings or other members of the family. Many a time, caregivers tend to bottle up their feelings and put up a positive front so as to avoid passing on any negative feelings to their care recipients. However, this can be extremely detrimental to their own mental and physical health in the long run. The main part of family therapy for caregivers, therefore, involves helping the caregiver and family members sort through challenging emotions and reach resolutions. Speaking about your feelings can help you find comfort, and allows you to gain further insight and through the guidance of the therapists, various emotional-coping strategies. Implementing them will certainly take some weight off your shoulders, and perhaps give you some enlightenment with regards to discovering new problem-solving strategies. 

 

Undeniably, caregivers will benefit tremendously from any assistance in their caregiving responsibilities from family members. Family therapy is extremely beneficial in helping to improve the interactions and support network among family members, especially in providing new perspectives on problems that are seemingly unmanageable (part of which involves building trust, mutual respect and openness). This hence reduces the level of stress within the family and the level of caregiver burden, on top of enhancing communication skills and boosting a positive sense of empowerment. 

 

Family therapy is focused on achieving precisely what is best for the whole family and its cohesiveness, and sorting out obstacles or issues challenging the family dynamics. It is important that you take the important step toward seeking help from professionals in order to achieve a better quality of life for yourself and your family. 

 

While face-to-face consultations are the norm, we understand that as caregivers, you may be faced with time constraints or other concerns. Thankfully, with technological advancement, virtual consultations are also becoming increasingly popular. They are equally effective and allow for more individuals to connect with their family therapists with greater ease. Of course, the decision is entirely yours to make. If you find yourself struggling, or simply feel that you need a trustworthy individual to speak to, feel free to get in contact with us

 


References:

  1. https://news.smu.edu.sg/news/2020/12/09/3-4-caregivers-persons-mental-health-issues-highlight-need-temporary-separation#:~:text=This%20survey%20by%20the%20Singapore,person%20with%20mental%20health%20issues. (Accessed 16/03/2022)
  2. https://au.lifestyle.yahoo.com/caregivers-take-care-of-person-with-mental-health-condition-help-wellness-031845657.html (Accessed 18/03/2022)
  3. https://www.apa.org/pi/about/publications/caregivers/practice-settings/common-problems (Accessed 18/03/2022)
  4. https://www.apa.org/pi/about/publications/caregivers/practice-settings/intervention/family-therapy (Accessed 18/03/2022)
  5. https://www.agingcare.com/articles/counseling-for-caregiver-burnout-126208.htm (Accessed 18/03/2022)
What is the Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)?

What is the Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA)?

The idea of becoming mentally incapacitated is often so frightful that most people simply avoid the issue. Discounting the various other ways someone can lose control of their mental faculties, in Singapore, 1 in 10 people above 60 will succumb to dementia and 3.6% of people will suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder, 1 in 50 people will experience a psychotic episode at some point in their lives, and 1% will suffer from schizophrenia, all conditions that might precipitate the loss of mental faculties. It’s a statistic that we’ve not brought up to alarm you, but simply to help you decide if you have someone in your life you trust to protect your interests, in the realm of your personal welfare, and property and affairs.

You simply have to be above the age of 21, by law in Singapore, to appoint one or more “donees”, who are people you trust “to make decisions on your behalf, in your best interests”. You, as the appointer of your donee(s), are known as the “donor”.

The Ministry of Social and Family Development suggests that it is beneficial to make an LPA as a protective measure against any untoward happenstance as it relates to your mental well-being. It is obviously best to decide what the best permutation for you is while you are capable of making rational decisions on your own behalf. Broadly, your appointed donee(s) will have control over one or both of the following aspects of your life: your personal welfare; and your property and affairs.

The LPA is designed to safeguard your interests, so it grants you the latitude of choice in deciding if: you want a single donee, whose powers are defined in Part IV of the Mental Capacity Act, or multiple donees. In the event that you decide that you would prefer multiple donees, you also have the power to decide if you will allow any one of them to act alone in making a decision on your behalf, or have them come to a consensus on undertaking a decision.

The difference between LPA Form 1 and LPA Form 2 is that LPA Form 2 allows you to appoint more than 2 donees, more than 1 replacement donee, or grant your donee(s) customised powers above the general powers with basic restrictions that donees are granted under LPA Form 1. LPA Form 2 requires the services of a lawyer.

After you have decided what’s best for you, and filling up LPA Form 1, or LPA Form 2, which you can do with the help of a lawyer, there is a “critical safeguard” in place to ensure that the LPA is not made under duress. This means that your LPA form will have to be witnessed and certified by an LPA certificate issuer, which can be:

  1. an Accredited Medical Practitioner;
  2. lawyer; or
  3. registered psychiatrist

As the writer of this article is none of the above, we recommend that you speak to your chosen LPA certificate issuer to fully understand the nuts and bolts of the LPA.

Nobody wishes to have the eventuality of an LPA come to pass, but we hope you will consider that “a stitch in time saves nine”. For Singapore citizens, the LPA Form 1 is free, until 31 August 2020.

Please refer to the MSF’s LPA FAQ for further details.

 


  1. Singapore Mental Health Study, 2016.
  2. Psychosis – Institute of Mental Health. https://www.imh.com.sg/clinical/page.aspx?id=258, accessed 8/6/20
  3. SA Chong, et al. A Risk Reduction Approach for Schizophrenia: The Early Psychosis Intervention Programme, Annals Academy of Medicine, Sep 2004 Vol 33 No. 5.
  4. Photo by Scott Graham on Unsplash